Who's Studying STEM?

Graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are critical to the UK economy, with research suggesting jobs are expected to grow at double the rate of other occupations, creating 142,000 jobs between now and 2023. To meet the increased demand for roles, it's vital that women and men continue to study STEM-related subjects at school, further education and higher education.I t’s a topic that is frequently discussed in the media and one that STEM companies are often trying to create strategies and tactics to tackle - how do we recruit more women into technology roles?



The Breakdown of STEM Graduates
Whilst it’s widely perceived that the STEM industries are mostly dominated by male workers, the latest insights reveal that more women than ever are now working in STEM related jobs. The latest figures are encouraging, but certain areas of STEM are still widely underrepresented by women - for example, computing. Due to how quickly science and technology jobs are becoming more and more digitally focussed, it’s a necessity for all workers in this area to have extensive computer skills.

When it comes to university, it’s important that, as a country, we’re make these rewarding and well-paid routes to STEM careers more accessible to women so that we can ensure the number of talented graduates continues to grow. As the STEM industries are expected to create thousands of new jobs in the coming years, it’s arguably the most critical it’s ever been that we ensure our nation places a focus on STEM in our education system. In order to meet this incoming demand for roles, it's vital that women and men are encouraged to continue to study STEM-related subjects at school, further education and higher education. View our graphic above to find out the latest breakdown of STEM graduates in the UK.